kenny jacobs

I favor the funny

58 notes

rocketeam:

A HEAP OF MEANING - a playlist based on the book “Nothing” by Janne Teller.
Some months ago I read this fantastic short novel by Danish writer Janne Teller and was absolutely astonished by it. This is some serious gutsy writing, not your common teenage-lit, and it comes without saying that this book is not for everybody, reviews are either hate or love but nothing in between, so in the spirit of the book I made this playlist that reflected my personal feelings on the story of Pierre-Anthon, a seventh-grader who realizes there is no meaning to life and his classmates’ mission to prove to Pierre-Anthon that life has meaning.
Everyday - The Raveonettes
Dead Believer Dog - Minks
Blood Bitch - Cocteau Twins
Living in America - The Sounds
Nothing is - My Bloody Valentine
Back and Forth - UNKLE
For your Bleeding - Le Butcherettes
Art Star - Yeah Yeah Yeahs
Don’t Go into that barn - Tom Waits
Dog Bite - Dead Kennedys
Closer - Nine Inch Nails
I’m Designer - Queens of the Stone Age
I am Made of Chalk - Crystal Castles
Altar of Sacrifice - Slayer
You Don’t Know Jesus - Mogwai
Take the Veil Cerpin Taxt - The Mars Volta
Hunting Bears - Radiohead
Like the book, this mix might leave you with a nauseous sense of escalating discomfort, if that is the case then I have been successful.  
Download Here and do so quick since the hosting will only last 24 hours.

rocketeam:

A HEAP OF MEANING - a playlist based on the book “Nothing” by Janne Teller.

Some months ago I read this fantastic short novel by Danish writer Janne Teller and was absolutely astonished by it. This is some serious gutsy writing, not your common teenage-lit, and it comes without saying that this book is not for everybody, reviews are either hate or love but nothing in between, so in the spirit of the book I made this playlist that reflected my personal feelings on the story of Pierre-Anthon, a seventh-grader who realizes there is no meaning to life and his classmates’ mission to prove to Pierre-Anthon that life has meaning.

  1. Everyday - The Raveonettes
  2. Dead Believer Dog - Minks
  3. Blood Bitch - Cocteau Twins
  4. Living in America - The Sounds
  5. Nothing is - My Bloody Valentine
  6. Back and Forth - UNKLE
  7. For your Bleeding - Le Butcherettes
  8. Art Star - Yeah Yeah Yeahs
  9. Don’t Go into that barn - Tom Waits
  10. Dog Bite - Dead Kennedys
  11. Closer - Nine Inch Nails
  12. I’m Designer - Queens of the Stone Age
  13. I am Made of Chalk - Crystal Castles
  14. Altar of Sacrifice - Slayer
  15. You Don’t Know Jesus - Mogwai
  16. Take the Veil Cerpin Taxt - The Mars Volta
  17. Hunting Bears - Radiohead

Like the book, this mix might leave you with a nauseous sense of escalating discomfort, if that is the case then I have been successful. 

Download Here and do so quick since the hosting will only last 24 hours.

(via bookporn)

395 notes

coolchicksfromhistory:

Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Shimizu, Manzanar Relocation Center, California.  Photograph by Ansel Adams.
February 19 is the Day of Remembrance for Japanese Americans Interned During WWII.
Currently, there are a number of great posts about Japanese American Internment in the History tag.  Previously, Cool Chicks from History recommended two books about Japanese American Internment: Silver Like Dust (Adult Non-Fiction) and Farewell to Manzanar (YA Non-Fiction).  

coolchicksfromhistory:

Mr. & Mrs. Dennis Shimizu, Manzanar Relocation Center, California.  Photograph by Ansel Adams.

February 19 is the Day of Remembrance for Japanese Americans Interned During WWII.

Currently, there are a number of great posts about Japanese American Internment in the History tag.  Previously, Cool Chicks from History recommended two books about Japanese American Internment: Silver Like Dust (Adult Non-Fiction) and Farewell to Manzanar (YA Non-Fiction).  

1,520 notes

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: February 19, 1942 - President Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066, leading to the incarceration of almost 120,000 Japanese Americans in concentration camps during World War II. 
The war-time measures applied to Japanese Americans in a sweeping way, uprooting entire communities particularly on the West Coast. Afterward, Japanese Americans fought a legal battle against the concentration camps all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The original Supreme Court decision which upheld the camps in the interests of ‘national security’ was later vacated (overturned on a technicality), but the Supreme Court never ruled that the camps were unconstitutional. After a decades-long battle, in 1988 the U.S. government was forced to formally apologize for the internment, admitting that government actions were based on “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership.” 
The U.S. government eventually disbursed more than $1.6 billion in reparations to Japanese Americans who had been interned and their descendents. Today Japanese American organizations on the West Coast organize an annual Day of Remembrance to mark this date and to continue to raise consciousness so that such attacks on civil liberties never happen again to Japanese Americans or oppressed groups. 
See Fight Back News coverage of this year’s Day of Remembrance 
(image: sign ordering Japanese Americans to concentration camps)
Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Today in history: February 19, 1942 - President Roosevelt signs Executive Order 9066, leading to the incarceration of almost 120,000 Japanese Americans in concentration camps during World War II.

The war-time measures applied to Japanese Americans in a sweeping way, uprooting entire communities particularly on the West Coast. Afterward, Japanese Americans fought a legal battle against the concentration camps all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. The original Supreme Court decision which upheld the camps in the interests of ‘national security’ was later vacated (overturned on a technicality), but the Supreme Court never ruled that the camps were unconstitutional. After a decades-long battle, in 1988 the U.S. government was forced to formally apologize for the internment, admitting that government actions were based on “race prejudice, war hysteria, and a failure of political leadership.”

The U.S. government eventually disbursed more than $1.6 billion in reparations to Japanese Americans who had been interned and their descendents. Today Japanese American organizations on the West Coast organize an annual Day of Remembrance to mark this date and to continue to raise consciousness so that such attacks on civil liberties never happen again to Japanese Americans or oppressed groups.

See Fight Back News coverage of this year’s Day of Remembrance 

(image: sign ordering Japanese Americans to concentration camps)

Via Freedom Road Socialist Organization (Fight Back!)

(via truth-has-a-liberal-bias)